Madera County
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Posts Tagged: Training

Program Coordinators and Leaders Gather for Annual Professional Development Meeting

 

The UC Master Gardener Program is well known for its volunteers' prolific extension of home horticulture, sustainable landscaping, and pest management to California residents. At times behind the scenes and at other times front and center, UC Master Gardener Program Coordinators and lead volunteers work diligently to ensure that volunteer cohorts have the skills and resources they need to succeed.

Last month UC Master Gardener statewide staff, program coordinators, and volunteer leaders gathered for their annual coordinator meeting. This year the annual coordinator meeting included two packed days full of training, sharing, and enrichment centered on volunteer engagement.

Program coordinators and volunteer leaders brainstormed ideas on ways to engage and support volunteers from all generations. Photo: Melissa Womack

Volunteer engagement is an approach to volunteer leadership that attempts to support volunteers throughout the volunteer lifecycle – from identification and selection through orientation and training to program recognition and evaluation. Presenters delivered informative presentations focusing on generation-informed approaches to volunteer engagement, best practices in adult and land-based learning, program evaluation, communication with government officials, and new resources.
 
Sample icebreakers were done in the morning as a team-building activity and to showcase interactive ways to have volunteers meet each other or buy into the training. In this icebreaker coordinators were asked to act out the phrase "Oh no! Look at that topped tree!"
 
Following a few sample icebreakers, coordinators received updates on the state of volunteer engagement within UC ANR from Gemma Miner, the UC 4-H Youth Development Program's Volunteer Engagement Coordinator. Building on this presentation, UC Master Gardener Program Volunteer Engagement Coordinator, Marisa Coyne, offered a presentation on applying a generational lens to the work of recruiting and retaining volunteers. Coordinators brainstormed generated ideas related to improving the generational diversity of UC Master Gardener volunteers and remarked that although each generation (traditionalist, baby boomer, generation X, and millennial) was shaped by different trends and events, many of their needs are similar.
 
Program Coordinator, Judy McClure, of Sacramento County welcomed attendees to the Fair Oaks Horticulture Center to learn about how gardens can be used as an outdoor classroom and learning space. Photo: Melissa Womack
 
A quick lunch was followed by a visit to the Fair Oaks Horticulture Center, a beloved community garden located in Sacramento County. The Horticulture Center hosts community events and workshops, including an annual Harvest Day in August attended by thousands in the region annually. At the garden, Lauren Snowden, Statewide Training Coordinator, demonstrated hands-on, multi-sensory, participant-focused facilitation methods, while teaching about bulbs for fall planting. UC Master Gardener Volunteer, Lori Thorson, gave her account of the impact of the program on her life. 
 
A hands-on demonstration about planting bulbs showcased multi-sensory and participant focused facilitation methods. Photo: Melissa Womack
 

The group re-convened bright and early the next day for a presentation by UC Davis Student Farm Associate Director, Carol Hillhouse. Drawing on her 30-year career in outdoor experiential learning with UC, Hillhouse outlined eight best practices for adult and land-based learning. “Adults come to education experiences with prior knowledge and with expectations,” said Hillhouse. “Successful volunteer engagement includes the acknowledgement and application of prior knowledge and an ability to meet adult learning goals.”

Carol Hillhouse, UC Davis Student Farm Associate Director, presented to the group about experiential learning and engaging volunteers. Photo: Melissa Womack
 

Next, Melissa Womack, Statewide Marketing and Communications Coordinator and Tamekia Wilkins, Statewide Evaluation Coordinator, led the group through an activity designed to help folks share program evaluation data using storytelling and data. As daily communication moves increasingly online, networks like Twitter and Facebook create opportunities for sharing impact with community members and community leaders.

 

Participants were asked to combine storytelling and impact data for various communication pieces. Photo: Melissa Womack
 
Before lunch, Coordinators were treated to a special presentation from Anne Megaro, UC ANR Government and Community Relations Director, who provided advice for effective communication with government officials and community leaders. Megaro noted that, in the local context, it is important to “know your champions,” meaning the individuals (volunteers included!), entities, and families that are committed to and recognize the worth of projects and offerings. 
 
Finally, a five person panel of program coordinators presented on the topic of partnerships for program effectiveness, sharing ideas for possible collaborations with juvenile rehabilitation programs, visually impaired communities, school districts, sustainability-focused non-profit organizations, and other UC ANR statewide programs.
 
Five coordinators and volunteer leaders, presented on projects that support the program's mission and are opportunities for meaningful partnerships within our communities. Photo: Melissa Womack
 
Just as UC Master Gardener Volunteers seek continuing education to ensure that their horticulture information and extension skills are sharp, program coordinators engage annually in professional development around volunteer management, program administration, and evaluation. Research on core competencies of Master Gardener Coordinators in North Carolina indicates that a variety of proficiencies are needed to successfully lead a Master Gardener Program. Annual coordinator meetings are a regular opportunity to build and share knowledge.

A list of coordinators can be found the UC Master Gardener Program website. Note: Some counties do not have UCCE staff coordinators. In these cases, UCCE Advisors or County Directors are listed as the lead contact per UC ANR policy.

Thank you to all who attended and presented at this year's coordinator meeting!
 
 
 

Program coordinators, volunteer leaders and the statewide staff gathered at the UC ANR building in Davis, CA for the UC Master Gardener Program's annual coordinator meeting. Photo: Melissa Womack
Program coordinators, volunteer leaders and the statewide staff gathered at the UC ANR building in Davis, CA for the UC Master Gardener Program's annual coordinator meeting. Photo: Melissa Womack

38 team members of the UC Master Gardener Program taking a group photo, holding sunflowers, in front of the UC ANR building.

Posted on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 11:16 AM
Tags: Master Gardener (32), Training (4), VMI (1), Volunteers (7)
Focus Area Tags: Yard & Garden

UC Master Gardener volunteers know household pests!

It's well known that the UC Master Gardener Program produces dedicated volunteers who are extremely knowledgeable about home horticulture and gardening. UC Master Gardener volunteers; especially those working at help desks, hotlines, and farmers markets, respond to thousands of requests each year, extending information and resources to California's residents that help them maintain landscapes, grow healthy food, and manage pests using the principles of integrated pest management (IPM).

Household pests such as cockroaches may be especially popular request topics within UC Master Gardener Programs serving the urban residential public in California. This photo shows oriental cockroaches, an outdoor species that can come into homes that are not properly sealed. Structural exclusion and other nonchemical preventive tactics can be used to solve this pest problem without the need for insecticides. Learn about this and other household pest solutions in order to better serve your clien

 

Pests don't disappear at the front door, however: there are plenty of significant pests threatening our households, structures, and communities. In fact, residents in urban counties may have more need for information and resources associated with household pest IPM than for landscape and garden IPM. Even rural counties are filled with homes that may be infested by key urban pests such as ants, cockroaches, bed bugs, flies, termites, pantry pests, and rodents.

UC Master Gardener Programs have seen increasing numbers and rates of requests for information about these pests. Using the principles of IPM, household pests can be effectively managed while minimizing negative impacts to our communities and the environment. For instance, many unnecessary pesticide applications are made in urban environments, leading to pesticide exposure events, pesticide resistance issues, and environmental contamination, especially of urban surface water systems. In many cases, pests could have been managed using preventive or nonchemical tactics.

Whether in the home or in the garden, IPM is one of the key knowledge areas in which UC Master Gardener volunteers receive training. Using the UC IPM website and its materials, such as Pest Notes and Quick Tips, UC Master Gardeners are able to help answer household pest requests. Even so, volunteers familiar with plant ecosystems may not always feel confident when addressing pest problems in the home. Luckily, an advanced training opportunity exists for UC Master Gardener volunteers who would like to increase their proficiency in household IPM. 

UC Master Gardeners use insect specimens, pest management products, and printed information to answer questions about key household pests during one of UC IPM’s Advanced IPM Training for MGs workshops. You can use an online continuing education module to train yourself and others about IPM for household pests in your home county.

A continuing education module, entitled Advanced IPM Training for UC Master Gardeners: Household Pests, was developed by Dr. Andrew Sutherland, Urban IPM Advisor in the San Francisco Bay Area. This advanced training has been provided several times for UC Master Gardeners at in-person hands-on workshops, but it is also available online within UC IPM's IPM Resources for UC Master Gardeners web portal.

The module includes a PowerPoint presentation, word-for-word script, instructions on hands-on exercises associated with the presentation, and handouts providing detailed information about the pests covered. Help Desk leaders and other UC Master Gardener volunteers can use these materials to deliver the modules to other volunteers using a train-the-trainer model. The module can also be delivered to residential clientele directly. Pests discussed include: ants, bed bugs, cockroaches, pantry pests, termites, and other wood-destroying insects.

We encourage you to take advantage of this unique training opportunity, and become a local expert on household pests. As always, UC ANR Advisors like Dr. Sutherland are available to answer difficult questions and to provide more in-depth training, but this module can certainly help you build confidence and prepare you for that next bed bug request (you know it's coming!).

The updated continuing education module can be found at the following URL: http://ipm.ucanr.edu/FAQ/mghousehold.html

For questions about this Household Pests module, please contact Dr. Andrew Sutherland

 

Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 2:54 PM
Tags: IPM (10), Master Gardener (32), Pests (6), Training (4)

Learning, Networking and Fun: A look back at the 2017 UC Master Gardener Conference

The Hyatt Regency was buzzing with activity as UC Master Gardener volunteers learned about the latest research in home horticulture at the 2017 UC Master Gardener Conference in Long Beach. New session topics, hands-on workshops and speakers were tailored to ensure the conference met attendees' continuing education and learning needs. The social media photo wall, book signing and conference commemorative pin provided a fun setting for participants to mingle and make memories to take home.

“[The 2017 UC Master Gardener Conference] far exceeded anything I expected. It was amazing, I learned so much, and I feel a part of a bigger community now. I had no idea UC Master Gardeners were such a friendly, happy, fun and wonderful group of people. It really inspires me to stay in the program,” said one conference goer.

UC Master Gardener volunteers from Riverside County taking a group photo together and having fun in front of the social media photo wall! ©UC Regents / Melissa Womack

Welcome & keynotes

To kick-off the conference attendees were welcomed to Southern California by Keith Nathaniel, UC Cooperative Extension Director in Los Angeles County and Darren Haver, UC Cooperative Extension and REC Director in Orange County. “Southern California has so much to showcase for gardeners. We have undeniably beautiful landscapes in addition to serious environmental challenges,” said Haver. “The conference promotes citizen science in a way that makes me proud to be part of UC where I know my research reaches the people who will use it to make a difference.”

Following the warm welcome from the hosting counties, statewide director, Missy Gable applauded the program and its volunteer's accomplishments. Gable then invited participants to take the opportunity to network and build relationships across the state.

"The UC Master Gardener Program is an incredible network of volunteers, coordinators, advisors and experts from across California,” said Gable. "We were extremely excited to be able to learn together and most importantly celebrate the incredible impacts and accomplishments of our volunteers."

Keynote speakers, Adam Schwerner, director of Horticulture and Resort Enhancement at Disneyland Resort, inspired attendees to look for opportunities to incorporate art and creativity into the garden. ©UC Regents / Marcy Sousa

Two keynote speakers, Adam Schwerner, Director of Horticulture and Resort Enhancement at Disneyland Resort and Dr. Allen Armitage, Author, Lecturer and emeritus professor at the University of Georgia kept the audience inspired. Each speaker offered unique and different perspectives on gardening in public spaces and home horticulture. Schwerner encouraged each attendee to not be afraid of taking risks in the garden, and to develop a personal artistic flair that speaks to them through experimentation and most importantly having fun. Armitage shared his passion of home horticulture, offering a glimpse intro the historical foundation for various plants as well as sharing stories as sharing stories and light-hearted lessons from the field. 

Conference attendees learning about diagnosing plant and pest diseases with the intensive session, Plant Diagnostics, with speaker Janine Hasey (not pictured). ©UC Regents / Melissa Womack

Sessions, sessions and more sessions!

With 58 break-out sessions and two keynote speakers there was a wealth of knowledge and experience available to all who attended the triennial conference. New this year was the option for attendees to register for special intensive sessions that offered unique or more in-depth trainings. Popular intensive sessions included, illustrated garden journaling, plant diagnostics, and Kirk Brown as John Bartram “America's 1st Master Gardener.” 

The Illustrated Garden Journal intensive session with artist, Brenda Swenson, offered attendees a unique conference experience, combining both art and science together. ©UC Regents / Marcy Sousa

Awards banquet and silent auction

Following an afternoon of inspiring guest and keynote speakers, attendees were invited to join together in the grand ballroom of the Long Beach Convention Center for the awards banquet and silent auction. Guests at the awards banquet were able to view and bid on beautiful baskets of local goods and handmade items, generously donated by local county programs and program supporters.

A special recognition and sincere thank you to the UC Master Gardeners of Ventura County for organizing and soliciting silent auction items. The silent auction was a huge success raising $7,910! All of the money raised is used to provide scholarships to UC Master Gardeners with a financial need at future conferences. 

Volunteers who reached volunteer hours milestones of more than 5,000 hours were honored during the awards banquet. Pictured from left to right: Missy Gable, Anne-Marie Walker, Cindy Peterson, Pauline Pedigo, Marcia Van Loy, Jan Youngquist, and UC ANR’s Wendy Powers and Mark Bell. ©UC Regents / Marcy Sousa

Celebrating the magic of volunteers

During the awards banquet volunteers who donated more than 5,000 volunteer hours were recognized and celebrated for their outstanding contributions to the University of California, our communities and our environment.

The magic of volunteers continued to be celebrated at the “Happiest Place on Earth.” Volunteers with more than 5,000 volunteer hours were invited to an exclusive behind-the-scenes horticulture tour at Disneyland Resort, before the park opened to the public. The tour at Disneyland Resort was a rich experience full of industry insight into design, installation and maintenance, as well as what it takes to create the perfect seasonal landscape.

Active UC Master Gardener volunteers with more than 5,000 volunteer hours were invited to a behind-the-scenes tour at Disneyland, hosted by the horticulture team at Disneyland Resort. ©UC Regents / Melissa Womack

Join us in thanking and honoring volunteers in your county who reached new hour milestones since the 2014 conference:

10,000+ Hours:  
  • Karen Schaffer, Santa Clara County
  • Bracey Tiede, Santa Clara County
7,500+ Hours:   
  • DJ DeProspero, Sonoma County
  • Fred Hoffman, Sacramento County
  • Dolores Ransom, Calaveras County
  • Milli Wright, Santa Clara County
5,000+ Hours:  
  • Pat Decker, Sonoma County
  • Charlotte Getz, San Diego County
  • Carol Graham, San Diego County
  • Nella Henninger, Santa Clara County
  • Barbara Hill, Ventura County
  • Judy Parker, Fresno County
  • Pauline Pedigo, Riverside County
  • Cindy Peterson, Riverside County
  • Ginni Renfrew, Neveda County
  • Lois Stevens, Marin County
  • Beth Teviotdale, Fresno County
  • Marge Tobias, Sonoma County
  • Marcia Van Loy, San Diego County
  • Bonnie Wagner, Santa Clara County
  • Leimone Waite, Shasta County
  • Anne-Marie Walker, Marin County
  • Jan Youngquist, Orange County

Grow LA Victory Garden took first-place in the Search for Excellence awards, for its work with teaching vegetable gardening basics to the residents of Los Angeles County. ©UC Regents / Melissa Womack

Search for Excellence & photo contest winners 

The top three winners for the Search for Excellence awards: Los Angeles, Orange and Marin counties were congratulated and presented their award certificates. Rachel Surls, advisor in UC Cooperative Extension Los Angeles County, gave an inspiring presentation about first-place winner – Grow LA Victory Garden Initiative. The Grow LA Victory Garden Initiative was developed in response to the need for a curriculum for beginning vegetable gardeners in Los Angeles County. 

Tom Furnanz won the Gardeners Choice award for his photo "Lily and the Swallowtail" in the Creatures in the Garden category for the 2017 UC Master Gardener Photo Contest. ©UC Regents / Melissa Womack

The conference also had a photo gallery where attendees could view and vote on their favorite photo contest finalist. The last day of the conference started with a “hurray” and lots of “awwws” during the announcement of the 2017 UC Master Gardener Photo Contest's Gardeners Choice award which went to Tom Fernanz, Calaveras-Tuolumne Counties, for his adorable photo titled, “Lily and the Swallowtail.”

We hope you join us in 2020!

Many thanks to the numerous volunteer, host counties and conference planning committee members who made the 2017 conference a reality. Without their dedication and support the conference would not have been possible. We look forward to continuing the celebration of the program and the magic of its volunteers at the 2020 UC Master Gardener Conference in Northern California.

Do you have a suggestion for the next conference or feedback for this year's event? Let us know at ucanr.edu/mgfeedback.

Attendees got hands-on experience with plant propagation from speaker Taylor Lewis, Teaching Nursery manager at the UC Davis Arboretum. ©UC Regents / Melissa Womack

Edible landscaping tips, food, and gardening advice from Rosalind Creasy, a pioneer in the field of edible landscaping.©UC Regents / Melissa Womack

 

Posted on Monday, September 11, 2017 at 8:08 AM
Tags: 2017 (1), conference (16), events (2), gardening (15), Master Gardener Conference (4), training (4)

Registration Now Open! 2017 UC Master Gardener Conference

Register and reserve lodging based on your conference needs. Tours start on Tues. Aug 22 and full conference starts on Weds. Aug. 23. (click image to enlarge)
Registration is now open for the 2017 UC Master Gardener Conference. We are thrilled for this year's event to be taking place in Southern California, at the Hyatt Regency Long Beach, just steps to the ocean and the Long Beach Convention Center.

The conference brings together dedicated volunteers, advisors, specialists and industry leaders from across the country to discuss the latest in home horticulture. Feedback from the previous conference and suggestions you provided via surveys, phone calls and committees shaped this year's sessions, speakers and schedule. Download the Registration and Tour Checklist before you start the registration process and prepare your conference journey.

$295 registration fee includes:

  • 58 breakout sessions with first-class speakers
  • 2 keynote speakers
  • Welcome conference bag and water bottle
  • Awards Banquet dinner
  • Breakfast, lunch and snacks
  • Conference activities: MarketPlace, Search for Excellence, Silent Auction, book signings … and more!

Lodging information

The conference is being hosted at the Hyatt Regency Long Beach, and is minutes away from the Long Beach airport .
Nestled at the border of Los Angeles and Orange Counties, Long Beach is the perfect blend of urban and beach making it the ideal location for the 2017 UC Master Gardener Conference. The conference is being hosted at the Hyatt Regency Long Beach, and is minutes away from the Long Beach airport and walking distance to the Aquarium of the Pacific, the Queen Mary, whale watching tours, shopping and dozens of restaurants.

Special conference rate:

  • $169 single/double occupancy
  • $194 triple occupancy
  • $219 quadruple occupancy

Make your reservation at the discounted conference rate online using the direct UC Master Gardener Conference link, or call (562) 491-1234. Remember to refer to the "UC Master Gardener Conference" room block when booking. 

Conference tour offerings

Community Engagement with Gardens and Nature is one of the many exciting tour options available at this year's conference.
Join Los Angeles and Orange County volunteers for an insider's view at some of the most famous and breathtaking gardens in California. This year's tours were carefully planned to offer a unique experience for attendees as well as to inspire and educate.

Tour offerings:

  • Explore the Huntington Botanical Gardens
  • Go California Native!
  • Community Engagement with Gardens and Nature
  • Dramatic Gardens from the Desert to the Sea
  • Los Angeles Farms and Garden History
  • Visit the Activities – Tour webpage for more detailed information

This event only takes place every three years so don't miss this unique opportunity to learn, be inspired and make new connections. Please join us for this engaging event and we look forward to seeing you in Long Beach!

Posted on Monday, April 3, 2017 at 12:58 PM
Tags: #2017UCMG (8), Conference (16), Training (4)
 
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